Probiotics and Antibiotics

Friendly bacteria - both alongside and following antibiotics

Research has shown that taking friendly bacteria (probiotics) alongside antibiotics can reduce the adverse effects of the antibiotics on the gut bacteria, helping to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria.

They can help to support the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of the antibiotics, helping to ensure the full course is completed.

Friendly bacteria - both alongside and following antibiotics

Research has shown that taking probiotics alongside antibiotics can reduce the adverse effects of the antibiotics on the gut bacteria, helping to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria.

Research has also shown that taking probiotics alongside antibiotics can help to support the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of the antibiotics, helping to ensure the full course is completed.

Antibiotics – what we need to know

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    Antibiotics are the most common type of medication prescribed for children.[1]

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    Antibiotics are often prescribed for viral infections, such as the common cold, but are designed to destroy bacteria (not viruses).[2]

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    Antibiotics are designed to kill bacteria that cause disease, but do not distinguish between good and bad bacteria and destroy all bacteria indiscriminately.[3]

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    Taking antibiotics can very quickly lead to an imbalance in the gut bacteria (microbiota) and balance may not be restored once the course of antibiotics is complete.[4]

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    A balanced microbiota is fundamental for our health.[5]

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    Friendly bacteria can help to maintain a balanced microbiota.[6]

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References

[1] Vangay P et al (2015) Antibiotics, Pediatric Dysbiosis, and Disease. Cell Host Microbe 17(5):553-564
[2] https://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotics-gps-still-erring-on-side-of-caution-despite-patients-requesting-less/ 13 Nov 2017
[3] Petersen C & Round JL (2014) Defining dysbiosis and its influence on host immunity and disease Cell Microbiol 16(7):1024-1033
[4] Madden JAJ et al (2005) Effect of probiotics on preventing disruption of the intestinal microflora following antibiotic therapy: A double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study. Int Immunopharmacol 5:1091-1097
[5] Round JL & Mazmanian SK (2009) The gut microbiome shapes intestinal immune responses during health and disease Nat Rev Immunol 9(5):313-323
[6] Plummer SF et al (2005) Effects of probiotics on the composition of the intestinal microbiota following antibiotic therapy. Int J Antimicrob Agents 26:69-74